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Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases

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The Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases (LCID) conducts clinical and basic studies of important human infectious and immunologic diseases. Sections of the laboratory focus on mycobacterial, bacterial, and fungal infections, as well as the acquired and congenital immune disorders associated with infection susceptibility and resistance. The program integrates clinical, cellular, and molecular investigation, including animal models and human natural history and therapeutic trials.

The defining feature of LCID is the focus on patients and their infections in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of natural history, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and management of diseases.

Training of physicians and scientists is central to the LCID mission. The NIAID infectious diseases training program and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Infectious Disease Consultation Service are located in LCID and are involved in all aspects of both clinical and laboratory activities. The integration of these programs into LCID is critical to the reciprocal education of basic scientists and clinical fellows alike.

The major themes of the laboratory center on infections that are recurrent or chronic, as these provide insight into both host and pathogen.

Sections and Units

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Major Areas of Research

  • Immune defects of phagocytes
  • Cytokines in the pathogenesis and therapy of infections
  • Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis
  • Tuberculosis drug discovery, mechanisms of action, and resistance
  • Mechanisms of fungal pathogenesis (Cryptococcus, Candidiasis, and Aspergillus)
  • Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease

Selected Clinical Protocols in LCID

  • Natural history and therapies of bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal infections
  • Natural history and therapies of immune defects
  • Immune responses to infections and vaccines
  • Identification of novel bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi
  • Lyme disease

Last Updated December 05, 2014

Last Reviewed May 09, 2013