Skip Navigation

Division of Intramural Research (DIR)

Skip Content Marketing
  • Share this:
  • submit to facebook
  • Tweet it
  • submit to reddit
  • submit to StumbleUpon
  • submit to Google +

DIR Laboratories

 

HIV Study
A researcher in the NIAID Laboratory of Allergic Diseases loads samples into gel electrophoresis apparatus. Credit: NIAID

The following is an alphabetical list of DIR laboratories with brief research descriptions. Scientists in these laboratories conduct peer-reviewed research in the areas described. These major laboratories comprise two or more labs (sections or units) headed by tenured or tenure-track principal investigators. DIR investigators are listed under Contact Information.

Cytokine Biology Section (CBS)

CBS studies the structure of the members of the human interferon (IFN)-alpha family to understand how they elicit their biological (antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory) activities. CBS also studies the effects of up- and down-regulation of specific proteins in a variety of signal transduction pathways following IFN treatment and the antiviral properties of human IFN-alpha constructs.
Kathryn C. Zoon, Ph.D., Section Chief

Emerging Viral Pathogens Section (EVPS)

EVPS conducts basic research to elucidate the pathophysiological processes associated with the severe morbidity caused by infections with viral hemorrhagic fevers and other Category A pathogens. In addition to developing animal models by using authentic microbial agents, EVPS develops treatment strategies that include vaccines, antimicrobials, immunoprophylaxis, and inhibitors of the coagulation cascade and cytokine storm to reverse the consequences of viral infection. Pathogen discovery also is a component of EVPS activities.
Peter Jahrling, Ph.D., Section Chief

Laboratory of Allergic Diseases (LAD)

LAD investigates disorders of immediate hypersensitivity, including classic allergic diseases. Basic research includes studies of mast cell and eosinophil biology and signaling pathways in inflammation. Clinical projects investigate the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation and the role of various cells and cytokines in this process. Research findings are translated into improved treatments for asthma, mast cell diseases, and other disorders.
Dean D. Metcalfe, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases (LCID)

LCID conducts clinical and basic studies of important mycobacterial, bacterial, viral, and fungal infections and of immune disorders associated with infection susceptibility and resistance. LCID’s patient-oriented approach promotes a comprehensive understanding of the natural history, pathogenesis, and management of diseases. Training of physicians and scientists is central to LCID’s mission.
Steven M. Holland, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Host Defenses (LHD)

LHD studies host defense against infection, the genetics and pathophysiology of disease in patients with inherited immune abnormalities, and mucosal immunity and inflammatory bowel diseases. Clinical investigations aim to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, including gene and cytokine therapies, to manage or correct immune dysfunction or recurrent infections in patients.
Harry L. Malech, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis (LHBP)

LHBP investigates the molecular basis of interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host, with special attention to organisms that cause important human infections, such as the Gram positive streptococci and staphylococci. The role of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in host defense and the contribution of biofilms to the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus epidermidis are major areas of study.
Frank DeLeo, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Immunogenetics (LIG)

LIG research focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling functions of immune cell receptors. Research encompasses a wide spectrum of experimental approaches, from the structural determination of immune receptors to the live cell image analysis of the behavior of chemotactic receptors. Development of new chemotherapies for tuberculosis is also a major area of study.
Susan K. Pierce, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Immunology (LI)

LI investigates the basic genetics, molecular biology, cell biology, and cellular immunology of the immune system. Current investigations include autoimmune disease pathogenesis, vaccine strategies, lymphocyte development, T- and B-cell receptor gene rearrangement, MHC molecule structure and function, antigen processing, T-cell and cytokine receptor signaling, apoptotic cell death, and regulation and activity of cytokines.
William E. Paul, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Immunoregulation (LIR)

LIR studies the regulation of the human immune system in health and disease, with emphasis on the immunopathogenic mechanisms of HIV infection and disease progression. Research includes studies of cytokines and chemokines in HIV replication, the latent reservoir of HIV-infected cells in AIDS and its implications for antiretroviral therapy, and immunologic approaches to the treatment of HIV infection.
Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Infectious Diseases (LID)

LID focuses on viral vaccine development, host immune response to viruses, and viral molecular biology and genetics. Major long-term programs are dedicated to understanding and preventing viral hepatitis, severe childhood respiratory diseases, and viral gastroenteritis. Newer programs focus on developing vaccines for pandemic influenza, West Nile virus, human metapneumovirus, and SARS-CoV—from basic research to clinical trials.
Jeffrey I. Cohen, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Intracellular Parasites (LICP)

LICP investigates the biology, pathogenesis, and immunity of intracellular pathogens such as chlamydia, salmonella, and the etiologic agents of tularemia and Q fever. The agents studied are important causes of disease and blindness and/or potential bioterrorism agents. The long-term goal of LICP is the development of improved strategies to prevent and control intracellular bacterial parasitic infections.
Harlan D. Caldwell, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Malaria Immunology and Vaccinology (LMIV)

LMIV conducts basic research in malaria immunology and pathogenesis, develops and produces prototype malaria vaccines, and conducts early-phase clinical trials of promising vaccine candidates. The lab's goal is to develop malaria vaccines that will reduce severe disease and death among African children and pregnant women and to eliminate malaria from low-transmission areas of the world.
Patrick Duffy, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research (LMVR)

LMVR studies disease-transmitting insects and broad areas of malaria biology and pathogenesis at locations on the National Institutes of Health campus and overseas. Basic discoveries support the development of new drug treatments, diagnostic tools, and vaccines. The LMVR environment is highly collaborative and is organized to foster research teamwork by experts in various disciplines of the biological, physical, and medical sciences.
Thomas E. Wellems, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Molecular Immunology (LMI)

LMI studies immune system function in health and disease with special interest in delineating mechanisms controlling specific leukocyte movement. Other research areas include G protein-coupled receptors of the immune system; mimics of chemotactic factors and their receptors in infectious agents; gut mucosal immunity; basic properties of dendritic cells; and molecular pathogenesis of complex infectious and immunologic diseases.
Philip M. Murphy, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology (LMM)

LMM conducts research on primate (HIV, SIV, HTLV) and murine retroviruses, with emphasis on HIV. Investigations focus on viral gene regulation, protein structure and function, and particle assembly; development of animal models for pathogenesis studies and development of vaccines and therapeutics; and studies of endogenous retroviral-related sequences present in mammalian genomes.
Malcolm A. Martin, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases (LPD)

LPD conducts basic and clinical studies to prevent, control, and treat diseases caused by parasitic protozoa (leishmania, toxoplasma, giardia, plasmodia, trypanosomes, cryptosporidia, entamoeba) and helminths (filariae, Schistosoma, Strongyloides, Taenia). Research includes basic aspects of host-pathogen interaction in humans, animal models, and invertebrate vectors of important parasites.
Alan Sher, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Persistent Viral Disease (LPVD)

LPVD studies the role of persistent infection in the development of immunosuppression and neurological disease. Models being examined include human, murine, and equine retroviruses; rabies virus; Aleutian disease virus of mink; and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases) such as scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
Bruce W. Chesebro, M.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Systems Biology (LSB)

LSB is an integrated team of scientists and support staff with expertise in computational biology, bioinformatics, proteomics, cell biology, immunology, and infectious diseases. It is established within NIAID and has an immune/infectious disease focus but is also expected to play a major role in fostering the growth of systems biology efforts across the range of NIH Institutes, in large measure through its development of new software tools for complex systems modeling and high-throughput screening.
Ronald N. Germain, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Viral Diseases (LVD)

LVD studies the basic mechanisms of viral entry into cells, regulation of viral gene expression, viral DNA replication, assembly and transport of viral proteins and particles, viral virulence, and humoral and cellular immunity. Applied research includes development of recombinant expression vectors, candidate vaccines, and antiviral agents. DNA and RNA viruses are studied, including HIV, poxviruses, papillomaviruses, and influenza.
Bernard Moss, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Virology (LV)

LV, at DIR’s Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, conducts innovative scientific research on viral agents requiring high or maximum containment (Biosafety Level-2 to Biosafety Level-4) to understand transmission, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and host immune responses, with the goal of developing diagnostics and countermeasures.
Heinz Feldmann, M.D., Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

Laboratory of Zoonotic Pathogens (LZP)

LZP investigates the molecular-level interaction between pathogens, including borrelia and yersinia, and their arthropod vectors. Research includes studies of differential gene regulation during transmission cycles in vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors; search for antigens to improve serological tests for the laboratory confirmation of zoonotic pathogens; and investigations of tick and flea biology.
Patricia Rosa, Ph.D., Laboratory Chief

back to top

Last Updated February 03, 2014