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Laboratory of Allergic Diseases

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Inflammation Immunobiology Section


Description of Research Program

Eosinophils are among the most poorly understood of the pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Our group takes a broad-based approach to the question of the role of these cells in host defense, as we study the biochemistry, physiology, and evolution of eosinophils and their secretory mediators.

 

Rosenberg Lab Group Photo
November 2011: Helene Rosenberg, Stephanie Glineur, Kim Dyer, Calvin Chan, Caroline Percopo, Katia Garcia-Crespo, Eva Sturm

 

Our work has suggested a new role for these cells in mediating important interactions with respiratory viral pathogens, most notably against the important pediatric pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We are actively pursuing this and other hypotheses, particularly in mouse models using a related pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a respiratory virus of the same family that naturally infects rodent populations. The results of our PVM studies have suggested immunomodulatory mechanisms that may serve as the basis for novel therapeutic strategies.

 

 Eosinophils from human peripheral blood, mouse bone marrow, and mouse bone marrow culture (stained and electron micrograph)
Eosinophils from human peripheral blood, mouse bone marrow, and mouse bone marrow culture (stained and electron micrograph)

 

Learn more about the scientists:
Helene F. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Section Chief
Kimberly D. Dyer, Ph.D., Staff Scientist

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Last Updated November 18, 2011