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Irini Sereti, M.D.
Building 10, Room 11B-07
10 Center Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-1876
Phone: 301-496-5533
Fax: 301-480-9978
isereti@niaid.nih.gov

Laboratory of Immunoregulation

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Irini Sereti, M.D.

 

Chief, HIV Pathogenesis Unit, LIR

Major Areas of Research

  • Pathogenesis of HIV infection emphasizing mechanisms of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in advanced HIV infection and of serious non-AIDS events in treated HIV-infected patients
  • Pathogenesis of idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL)
  • Immune-based therapeutic strategies of HIV infection and ICL
 

Program Description

The primary research focus of our group is the study of inflammatory complication in HIV including immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). IRIS is an aberrant immune response, frequently with an intense inflammatory component, that can occur in the context of immune restoration in patients with HIV infection and severe CD4 lymphopenia after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Chronically treated patients on the other hand may experience non-infectious complications of HIV, including cardiovascular disease that seem to be driven by chronic residual immune activation and inflammation. The second interest is development of adjuvant immune-based therapies (IBT) to improve immune restoration in CD4 lymphopenic conditions such as HIV and idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia (ICL). ICL is a rare, likely heterogeneous condition characterized by low CD4 T-cell counts in the absence of HIV or other known infection or disease that can cause lymphopenia.

Biography

Dr. Sereti received her M.D. from the University of Athens, Greece, in 1991. She did research for one year in Dr. Greg Spear’s laboratory at Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago and then completed an internship, residency, and chief residency in medicine at Northwestern University. In 1997, Dr. Sereti came to the National Institutes of Health as a clinical associate in the Laboratory of Immunoregulation. She became a staff clinician in 2003. She was appointed to a clinical tenure-track position in 2009.

Research Group

Virginia Sheikh
Ainhoa Perez-Diez
Xiangdong Liu
Stig Jensen
Denise Hsu
Melissa Schechter

Selected Publications

Sereti I, Estes JD, Thompson WL, Morcock DR, Fischl MA, Croughs T, Beq S, Lafaye de Micheaux S, Yao MD, Ober A, Wilson EM, Natarajan V, Imamichi H, Boulassel MR, Lederman MM, Routy JP. Decreases in colonic and systemic inflammation in chronic HIV infection after IL-7 administration. PLoS Pathog. 2014 Jan 30;10(1):e1003890.

Krishnan S, Wilson EM, Sheikh V, Rupert A, Mendoza D, Yang J, Lempicki R, Migueles SA, Sereti I. Evidence for innate immune system activation in HIV type 1-infected elite controllers. J Infect Dis. 2014 Mar;209(6):931-9.

Wilson EM, Sereti I. Immune restoration after antiretroviral therapy: the pitfalls of hasty or incomplete repairs. Immunol Rev. 2013 Jul;254(1):343-54.

Barber DL, Andrade BB, Sereti I, Sher A. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome: the trouble with immunity when you had none. Nat Rev Microbiol. 2012 Jan 9;10(2):150-6.

Puronen CE, Thompson WL, Imamichi H, Beq S, Hodge JN, Rehm C, Parker R, DerSimonian R, Brenchley JM, Sereti I. Decreased interleukin 7 responsiveness of T lymphocytes in patients with idiopathic CD4 lymphopenia. J Infect Dis. 2012 May;205(9):1382-90.

Mahnke YD, Greenwald JH, DerSimonian R, Roby G, Antonelli LR, Sher A, Roederer M, Sereti I. Selective expansion of polyfunctional pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells in HIV-1-infected patients with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Blood. 2012 Mar 29;119(13):3105-12.

Visit PubMed for a complete publication listing.

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Last Updated March 27, 2014