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Mario Roederer, Ph.D.
Vaccine Research Center
Building 40, Room 5509
40 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-3015
Phone: 301-594-8491
Fax: 301-480-2788
roederer@nih.gov

Additional Information From NIAID

Vaccine Research Center (VRC)

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Mario Roederer, Ph.D.

Photo of Mario Roederer, Ph.D.

Chief, ImmunoTechnology Section

Major Areas of Research

  • Characterization of antigen-specific lymphocyte function and differentiation in vivo, following vaccination or infection
  • Identification of protective SIV and HIV envelope antibody responses
  • Development of new single-cell measurement technologies
 

Program Description

The ImmunoTechnology Section (ITS) is dedicated to understanding the roles and interactions of the individual components of the mature central immune system, with a particular eye toward the changes occurring during acute or chronic antigenic challenge. In general, we are looking for immunological correlates of protection (for vaccines) and correlates of pathogenesis (in disease).

Using high-content, high-throughput single-cell technologies (flow cytometric and transcriptomic), we are defining the functional repertoire of antigen-specific T and B cells and how these differ across vaccine regimens and infections. Using the nonhuman primate model, we can interrogate these cells from different tissues throughout the body, studying homeostasis, differentiation, and homing in vivo. We promote selected assays for use in clinical studies, in search of new assays to define protective immune responses.

We are also actively involved in the development and advancement of single-cell technology: instrumentation, reagents, analysis, and assays. We carry out a wide range of collaborations to bring our unique and advanced technology (18-color flow cytometry) to other laboratories at the Vaccine Research Center (VRC), NIH, and around the world. More recently, we have begun to integrate this technology with single-cell transcriptomics to provide an unprecedented view of transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulation at the single-cell level. We are working on new flow cytometric technologies to extend beyond 25 parameters.

We are actively working on new bioinformatic approaches to analyze the complex datasets arising from these studies. We developed a widely-used analysis and graphing program, SPICE, for summarizing large flow cytometry data outputs; we are working on a similar project, SPONGE, for single-cell transcriptomics data.

Biography

Dr. Roederer received his B.S. in chemistry in 1983 from Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California, followed by his Ph.D. in biological sciences in 1988 from Carnegie Mellon, Pittsburgh, in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Murphy. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow and then as a research fellow at Stanford University from 1988 to 1999 in the laboratory of Dr. Leonard Herzenberg. Following this, he was adjunct associate professor, department of stomatology, University of California, San Francisco, until 2000, when he came to the VRC. He is a senior investigator and is chief of ITS, director of the Flow Cytometry Core, and director of the Nonhuman Primate Immunogenicity Core within the Laboratory of Immunology.

Selected Publications

Dominguez MH, Chattopadhyay PK, Ma S, Lamoreaux L, McDavid A, Finak G, Gottardo R, Koup RA, Roederer M. Highly multiplexed quantitation of gene expression on single cells. J Immunol Methods. 2013 May 31;391(1-2):133-4

Lugli E, Dominguez MH, Gattinoni L, Chattopadhyay PK, Bolton DL, Song K, Klatt NR, Brenchley JM, Vaccari M, Gostick E, Price DA, Waldmann TA, Restifo NP, Franchini G, Roederer M. Superior T memory stem cell persistence supports long-lived T cell memory. J Clin Invest. 2013 Feb 1;123(2):594-9.

Chattopadhyay PK, Gaylord B, Palmer A, Jiang N, Raven MA, Lewis G, Reuter MA, Nur-ur Rahman AK, Price DA, Betts MR, Roederer M. Brilliant violet fluorophores: a new class of ultrabright fluorescent compounds for immunofluorescence experiments. Cytometry A. 2012 Jun;81(6):456-66.

Mahnke YD, Greenwald JH, DerSimonian R, Roby G, Antonelli LR, Sher A, Roederer M, Sereti I. Selective expansion of polyfunctional pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells in HIV-1-infected patients with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Blood. 2012 Mar 29;119(13):3105-12.

Bolton DL, Song K, Wilson RL, Kozlowski PA, Tomaras GD, Keele BF, Lovingood RV, Rao S, Roederer M. Comparison of systemic and mucosal vaccination: impact on intravenous and rectal SIV challenge. Mucosal Immunol. 2012 Jan;5(1):41-52.

Lugli E, Mueller YM, Lewis MG, Villinger F, Katsikis PD, Roederer M. IL-15 delays suppression and fails to promote immune reconstitution in virally suppressed chronically SIV-infected macaques. Blood. 2011 Sep 1;118(9):2520-9.

Visit PubMed for a complete publication listing.

 

For more information on research conducted by Mario Roederer, Ph.D. visit the Flow Cytometry Core and Non-Human Primate Immunogenicity Core.

Last Updated July 16, 2013