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Successful Public-Private Partnership Between NIAID and Sequella Yields Promising New TB Drug for Clinical Testing

September 12, 2006


Statement of Christine F. Sizemore, Ph.D.,
Barbara E. Laughon, Ph.D.,
and Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health


The need for new drugs against tuberculosis (TB) has never been more urgent, as the global burden of the disease continues to grow, and the incidence of extensive drug-resistant (XDR) TB, a virtually untreatable disease, continues to rise. A key component in advancing new health care interventions for TB is the creation of productive partnerships between pharmaceutical companies and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health.

The success of one such public-private partnership has been demonstrated by Sequella, Inc., which recently received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration to enter Phase I clinical trials with their TB drug candidate SQ109.

SQ109 was discovered in NIAID’s intramural laboratories in 1999, and developed with extensive support from NIAID as well as the National Cancer Institute/NIAID Inter-Institute Program for the Development of AIDS-related Therapeutics.

These efforts are part of a wide array of NIAID-supported TB research projects, from fundamental research to understand Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes TB, through product-oriented translational and clinical studies of potential methods of TB prevention and treatment. The successful transition of SQ109 from the laboratory to clinical testing not only represents a major milestone for the NIAID TB program and Sequella, but also speaks to the successes public-private partnerships can yield.

To view Sequella’s recent news release on SQ109, see www.sequella.com.

###

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., is Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health. Christine F. Sizemore, Ph.D., is Acting Chief of the Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases Section in the NIAID Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Barbara E. Laughon, Ph.D., is Chief of the Complications and Co-Infections Research Branch of the Therapeutics Research Program in the NIAID Division of AIDS.

Media inquiries can be directed to the NIAID NIAID News and Public Information Branch at 301-402-1663, niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov.


NIAID conducts and supports research—at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide—to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at www.niaid.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

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Important note: Information on this page was accurate at the time of publication. This page is no longer being updated.
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Last Updated September 12, 2006