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Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding. Link to Part 1. Qualify for NIH Funding. Link to Part 2. Pick and Design a Project. Link to Part 3. Write Your Application. Link to Part 4. Submit Your Application. Link to Part 5. Assignment and Review. Link to Part 6. If Not Funded. Link to Part 7. Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 4. Submit Your Application   ·   Strategy for Getting Ready to SubmitNext page in Strategy.

Timing for Submitting Your Application

To help you make informed decisions and head off problems at each step, this page lays out all the time-sensitive actions involved in submitting. Learn the advantages of submitting for different review cycles and the consequences of receipt dates and other timing-related topics. Understand timing factors for correcting errors and using the viewing window so you can complete your submission on time.

This is also a good point to start getting ready your just-in-time information to avoid a delay in getting your grant.

This page applies to any application using electronic submission.

Submission Timeline

The upper timeline shows major steps from application to award for a simple non-AIDS application, such as an R01. We give actual months only for precise timing events: the receipt date—indicated by the Due arrow—through the advisory Council meeting. Months to funding varies by 11 months depending on whether you must wait until the end of the fiscal year to get a grant.

Expanding the colored section in the top timeline, the lower timeline shows major action items and timeframes in more detail for Part 4.

See neighboring text for summary.

For timelines for other sections, go to Strategy Timelines. For more detailed timing information, including for AIDS applications, go to R01 Planning to Award Timeline by Review Cycle.

Understand Timing

Action Summary Learn More

Allot time to heading off problems.

If you haven't done so already, make sure your application looks good and reads well.

Allow enough time because revisions in one section may trigger other changes.

Our Advice

Part 3

Learn the consequences of deadlines and timing issues.

Know the effect of different submission dates on the timing of funding.

  • Cycle 1—the shortest waiting time if you need to resubmit.
  • Cycle 3—shortest wait to find out if your application will be paid at the end of the fiscal year.

Factor your institution's deadlines into your timing so you will be ready to submit.

  • The NIH Guide announcement for your funding opportunity announcement will give you a receipt date, but your internal submission deadline is your key deadline, not the NIH receipt date.
  • Your institution's authorized organizational representative (AOR) will submit to Grants.gov on your behalf.

Understanding the submission process and deadlines will help you work with your AOR to submit on time and correct the application if needed.

Your institution will need to allow enough time for your application to get through Grants.gov and eRA Commons validations.

Just the Facts

Get Ready Now to Apply Electronically in Part 2

Prepare to Submit (includes Rules for Late Applications) in Part 4

Definitions

Our Advice

Timing Factors That Affect Your Application and Award

Prepare to Submit in Part 4

Know what constitutes an on-time submission to Grants.gov.

To submit on time, your institution will need to allow enough time for your application to get through Grants.gov and eRA Commons validations, including the possibility of having to submit a corrected application.

Your application is on time if Grants.gov timestamps it by 5:00 p.m. your institution's local time on the receipt date listed in the funding opportunity announcement.

Grants.gov confirmation usually arrives within minutes, but it can take 48 hours or more during busy periods.

Your application must pass Grants.gov validation to move on to the next step, eRA Commons validation, which may take up to 24 hours.

Don't count on submitting late.

Just the Facts

Part 4

Grants.gov

Definitions

Our Advice

Part 4

Understand timing factors for correcting errors and using the viewing window.

If you have errors, correct them and have your AOR submit a new application well ahead of the deadline.

For a corrected application to be on time, it must get a Grants.gov timestamp by 5:00 p.m. your institution's local time on the deadline.

Be sure to use the viewing window NIH gives you to check the application image to make sure it rendered correctly.

  • Keep checking to see when the image appears.
  • The viewing window lasts two days.
  • If your viewing window extends beyond the deadline, you can't make corrections, but you can address technical problems with the image. Contact the eRA Commons Help Desk immediately.

After the viewing window is over, the application moves from the Commons to peer review.

Consider whether to withdraw an imperfect application and know why that step might be advantageous.

For more information, also see the timelines above.

Just the Facts

Part 4

eRA Commons

Definition: viewing window

Our Advice

Part 4

Get ready for just-in-time.

Prepare your just-in-time information early in case you are selected for funding, so you do not experience a delay or miss out on getting an award altogether.

Just the Facts

Prepare Your Just-in-Time Information in Part 3

Just-in-Time SOP

Just-in-Time questions and answers

Definition: just-in-time

Our Advice

Prepare Your Just-in-Time Information in Part 3

Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 4. Submit Your Application   ·   Strategy for Getting Ready to SubmitNext page in Strategy.

See the other sections of
Part 4. Submit Your Application

Table of Contents for the Strategy

We welcome your comments, questions, or suggestions. Email deaweb@niaid.nih.gov.

Last Updated October 26, 2011

Last Reviewed September 30, 2011