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Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding. Link to Part 1. Qualify for NIH Funding. Link to Part 2. Pick and Design a Project. Link to Part 3. Write Your Application. Link to Part 4. Submit Your Application. Link to Part 5. Assignment and Review. Link to Part 6. If Not Funded. Link to Part 7. Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 7. Funding   ·   Strategy for Funding DecisionsNext page in Strategy.

Timing for Funding and Staying Funded

This page gives you timing actions for the three aspects of funding covered in this part: making funding decisions, getting and managing a grant, and staying funded.

Learn how the timing of your submission may affect the timing of your award and when you can expect us to issue the grant.

Get an introduction to the timing of your required reports, learn about renewal timing, and consider our advice on staying funded so you can avoid a break in funding.

Note: foreign grantees and investigators should use our Grants Policy and Management Training for Foreign Investigators for information on negotiating and managing their grants.

Funding and Staying Funded Timelines

This page has three timelines: funding decisions, renewal, and staying funded.

Funding Decisions Timeline

The upper timeline shows major action items and their timeframes from preparation to award for a simple non-AIDS application, such as an R01. We give actual months only for precise timing events: the receipt date—indicated by the Due arrow—through the advisory Council meeting. Months to funding varies by 11 months depending on whether you must wait until the end of the fiscal year to get a grant.

Expanding the colored section in the top timeline, the lower timeline shows major action items and timeframes in more detail for Part 7.

See neighboring text for summary. 

Renewal Timeline

This timeline shows major action items and their timeframes from preparation to award for a simple non-AIDS application, such as an R01. Months to funding varies by 11 months depending on whether you must wait until the end of the fiscal year to get a grant.

See neighboring text for summary. 

Staying Funded Timeline

This timeline depicts a strategy of staying funded by submitting multiple awards. The number and timing of applications shown are for illustration purposes only.

See neighboring text for summary. 

For timelines for other sections, go to Strategy Timelines. For more detailed timing information, including for AIDS applications, go to R01 Planning to Award Timeline by Review Cycle.

Understand Timing

Action Summary Learn More

Know how the timing of your submission may affect the timing of your award.

At this point you may want to first read Timing for Assignment and Review in Part 5 for steps to take after review.

The cycle you applied for affects the timing of awards.

  • Submitting for Cycle 1 at the beginning of a fiscal year almost always results in a delay because we don't usually have a budget.
  • If you submitted for Cycle 2, we may still be operating under interim paylines, so you may experience a delay.
  • If you submitted for Cycle 3, you won't have to wait long to find out if your application will be funded if it was deferred until the end of the fiscal year.
  • Read more about submission cycles and the timing of funding in Timing Factors That Affect Your Application and Award.

Just the Facts

Paylines and Budget Pages Change Throughout the Year in NIAID Funding Opportunity Planning and the Budget Cycle

Definitions

Our Advice

Strategy for Funding Decisions in Part 7

Timing for getting a grant.

If your application scores within the payline, you would generally get a grant six to eight weeks after our advisory Council meeting:

  • Earlier if your application underwent expedited second-level review.
  • Later for the following circumstances:
    • At the start of fiscal year, we do not have a budget
    • Study section had human subjects or animal concerns.
    • You have a complex activity code, e.g., a cooperative agreement (U series).

If you have any barriers to funding such as a bar to award, talk to your program officer immediately.

Just the Facts

Know What a Summary Statement Means in Initial Peer Review and Your Next Steps in Part 5

How NIAID Makes Funding Decisions in Part 7

NIAID Paylines

Advisory Council portal—Council meeting schedule

Bars to Grant Awards SOP

Definitions

Our Advice

How NIAID Makes Funding Decisions in Part 7

Timing for managing a grant.

Know the timing of your reporting and other requirements for managing your award.

  • Go to Standard Reports for NIH-Funded Grants.
  • In addition, you may have other requirements, such as your certification of IRB approval every year for human subjects research or IACUC approval every three years for vertebrate animal research.

Know which grant actions you can take on your own.

For actions requiring our approval, submit your request at least 30 days or more in advance. Some changes in scope require a two-month notification.

Just the Facts

How to Manage Your Grant (domestic grants) in Part 7

NIAID Grants Policy and Management Training for Foreign Investigators (foreign grants)

Prior Approvals for Post-Award Grant Actions SOP

Definitions

Our Advice

Advice for Managing Your Grant in Part 7

Understand renewal timing.

Figure up to 19 months from submission to award (for non-AIDS) if your renewal application is funded on the first try.

Know strategies to avoid a funding gap.

Go to Timing Factors That Affect Your Application and Award to learn the advantages of applying for different cycles:

  • Cycle 1— the shortest wait if you need to resubmit your renewal application.
  • Cycle 3—shortest wait to find out if your application will be paid at the end of the fiscal year.

For an investigator-initiated application, apply at the renewal receipt dates listed in NIH's Standard Due Dates for Competing Applications.

Just the Facts

Application timelines

Definitions

Our Advice

How to Renew Your Application in Part 7

Consider our timing advice on staying funded.

In addition to renewing your existing grants, create a series of new applications so you maintain a stream of funding over time.

Your goal is to avoid a break in funding by applying early enough to get an award before your grant ends.

Start planning new applications as soon as you can, and consider different types of NIH grants and awards from different sources.

To maximize your chances of success, submit new and renewal applications at different times.

Know when you can use the same NIH application—appropriately modified—more than once.

Just the Facts

Approaches for Staying Funded in Part 7

Application timelines

Our Advice

Approaches for Staying Funded in Part 7

Timing Factors That Affect Your Application and Award—submission cycles and the timing of funding

Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 7. Funding   ·   Strategy for Funding Decisions Next page in Strategy.

See the other sections of
Part 7. Funding

Table of Contents for the Strategy

We welcome your comments, questions, or suggestions. Email deaweb@niaid.nih.gov.

Last Updated March 16, 2012

Last Reviewed September 30, 2011