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Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding. Link to Part 1. Qualify for NIH Funding. Link to Part 2. Pick and Design a Project. Link to Part 3. Write Your Application. Link to Part 4. Submit Your Application. Link to Part 5. Assignment and Review. Link to Part 6. If Not Funded. Link to Part 7. Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Master the Application   

Example of Text Without Formatting

The text below from Does It Look Good? in Master the Application in Part 3. illustrates how text can be virtually unreadabale without formatting.

Does It Look Good? Keep in mind that your reviewers have a multitude of applications to evaluate, so they'll appreciate one that's visually appealing and super user friendly. Here's how to do that: Divide into sections. Use headers to create structure and white space. Also, try breaking up text since blocks of uninterrupted text are depressing to look at. See for yourself at Example of Text Without Formatting (this page) in Part 3. Write Your Application. Guide with graphics. Graphics, timelines, and other visual elements help reviewers grasp a lot of information. Be aware, though, that some application parts, i.e., Project Summary/Abstract and Project Narrative, should be text only. Label all materials clearly. Make it easy for reviewers to find information. Edit and proofread. Your presentation—writing and appearance—can make or break your application, so eliminate typos and internal inconsistencies. And, since two or more sets of eyes are better than one, ask other people—including nonscientists—to read your application.

In contrast, here is the formatted text.

Does It Look Good?

Keep in mind that your reviewers have a multitude of applications to evaluate, so they'll appreciate one that's visually appealing and super user friendly. Here's how to do that:

  • Divide into sections. Use headers to create structure and white space. Also, try breaking up text since blocks of uninterrupted text are depressing to look at. See for yourself at Example of Text Without Formatting (this page) in Part 3. Write Your Application.
  • Guide with graphics. Graphics, timelines, and other visual elements help reviewers grasp a lot of information. Be aware, though, that some application parts, i.e., Project Summary/Abstract and Project Narrative, should be text only.
  • Label all materials clearly. Make it easy for reviewers to find information.
  • Edit and proofread. Your presentation—writing and appearance—can make or break your application, so eliminate typos and internal inconsistencies. And, since two or more sets of eyes are better than one, ask other people—including nonscientists—to read your application.

Return to Does It Look Good? in Master the Application in Part 3.

Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Master the Application   

See the other sections of
Part 3. Write Your Application

Table of Contents for the Strategy

Last Updated September 29, 2011

Last Reviewed September 29, 2011