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Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding. Link to Part 1. Qualify for NIH Funding. Link to Part 2. Pick and Design a Project. Link to Part 3. Write Your Application. Link to Part 4. Submit Your Application. Link to Part 5. Assignment and Review. Link to Part 6. If Not Funded. Link to Part 7. Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 5. Assignment and Review   ·   Strategy for Assignment and ReviewNext page in Strategy.

Timing for Assignment and Review

On this page, you'll find your timing-related actions for requesting assignment to an institute and study section and for initial peer review.

Know what materials you may be able to send to your scientific review officer after submission.

Several important events take place around this time. Before the review meeting, NIH posts study section rosters; after the meeting, it posts scores and summary statements in the eRA Commons.

Know your actions and when to take them, and learn about the timing of awards—after the advisory Council meeting or earlier for some applications.

Review Timeline

The upper timeline shows major steps from application to award for a simple non-AIDS application, such as an R01. We give actual months only for precise timing events: the receipt date—indicated by the Due arrow—through the advisory Council meeting. Months to funding varies by 11 months depending on whether you must wait until the end of the fiscal year to get a grant.

Expanding the colored section in the top timeline, the lower timeline shows major action items and timeframes in more detail for Part 5.

See neighboring text for summary.

* You can withdraw your application until the review meeting without its counting toward your one resubmission limit. Read more at Consider other time sensitive actions you may wish to take just before initial peer review below.

For timelines for other sections, go to Strategy Timelines. For more detailed timing information, including for AIDS applications, go to R01 Planning to Award Timeline by Review Cycle.

Understand Timing

Action Summary Learn More

Understand when and how to request assignment.

Before applying, you have the option of requesting assignment to a study section and institute in your cover letter. We recommend requesting these assignments.

After your application makes it through the eRA Commons, it arrives at the NIH Center for Scientific Review (CSR).

  • CSR makes these assignments for you if you did not.
  • If you did request assignments, CSR makes the final determination.

Within seven to ten days after you apply, find your assignments and institute contacts in the eRA Commons.

If you don't see your study section assignment within two weeks, call the NIH Referral Office at 301-435-0715.

Just the Facts

Create a Cover Letter in Part 4

Ensure You Get the Right Assignments in Part 5

Definitions

Our Advice

Create a Cover Letter in Part 4

Ensure You Get the Right Assignments in Part 5—includes how to choose a study section and what to do if you're not happy with an assignment

Consider other time-sensitive actions you may wish to take just before initial peer review.

Know what materials you may submit late.

Think about withdrawing an imperfect application. Know the timing considerations for withdrawing before and after peer review.

Prepare your just-in-time information if you did not do so already.

Find additional actions in the next section.

Just the Facts

Prepare Your Just-in-Time Information in Part 3

Assess Your Application After You Submit in Part 4

Definitions

Our Advice

Assess Your Application After You Submit in Part 4

Know the timing of NIH's actions for peer review.

Within four to five months (two months less if AIDS or AIDS-related) of applying, your application undergoes initial peer review.

Study section rosters

  • Updated rosters should appear in the Commons about 30 days before the scheduled meeting.
  • If you see a problem with the composition of the committee, contact the scientific review officer to discuss issues, such as expertise or conflicts of interest.

Scores. NIH releases overall impact scores in the Commons within roughly three days after the review meeting.

Summary statements. Investigators who are not new get a summary statement within 30 days after the review meeting.

New R01 investigators are on a different schedule.

  • Get summary statements no later than July 10, November 10, or March 10 (depending on the review cycle).
  • Can resubmit later: August 10, December 10, or April 10, giving them one month to revise and resubmit for the next receipt date.

Note: as of 2010, less than 13 percent of new investigators who received summary statements in that timeframe were able to resubmit for the next receipt date.

Just the Facts

Part 5

Are You "New"? in the New Investigator Guide to NIH Funding

Definitions

Our Advice

Initial Peer Review and Your Next Steps in Part 5

Know what to do after review.

Check NIAID's paylines.

Contact your program officer after you receive your summary statement.

  • Does the possibility of funding exist?
  • See what you might need to do in advance of the just-in-time request.
  • Get advice on what to do if your application scores above the payline.

Contact your program officer quickly if your summary statement has a human subjects or animal research code indicating study section concerns that create a bar to award.

  • If your summary statement has a code that creates a bar to award, we can't give you an award until you resolve the issue.
  • Read more in the links at right.

Though you may want to act quickly, do not resubmit before ready—you get only one resubmission.

 

Just the Facts

Part 5

Part 7. Funding

Bars to Grant Awards SOP

Bar to award codes:

Definitions

Our Advice

Initial Peer Review and Your Next Steps in Part 5

What to Do if You Get Bad News in Part 6

When to Contact an NIAID Program Officer

Understand second-level review.

Before we can fund your application, it undergoes a second-level review for any administrative issues.

  • For most applications, second-level review takes place about seven months after submission, four months for AIDS-related research.
  • Some applications get an expedited review as many as eight weeks before our advisory Council meeting and are funded earlier.

For most grants, we notify you within six to eight weeks after the advisory Council meeting about whether we will fund your application, earlier if it underwent expedited second-level review.

For more timing information for funding, go to:

Just the Facts

Council's Second-Level Review in Part 5

Advisory Council portal—Council meeting schedule

Definitions

Strategy for NIH Funding
Navigation for the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Previous page in Strategy.Part 5. Assignment and Review   ·   Strategy for Assignment and ReviewNext page in Strategy.

See the other sections of
Part 5. Assignment and Review

Table of Contents for the Strategy

We welcome your comments, questions, or suggestions. Email deaweb@niaid.nih.gov.

Last Updated March 16, 2012

Last Reviewed September 30, 2011