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NIAID Staff Roles Questions and Answers

Table of Contents

Where do I find help?

Go to Communicating With NIAID—How to Get Help in the Strategy for NIH Funding and the Finding Help questions and answers.

Who advises applicants and grantees?

NIAID program officers, grants management specialists, and scientific review officers can help you at different stages.

Read more at Communicating With NIAID—How to Get Help in the Strategy for NIH Funding and our Program Officers SOP.

Who advises offerors and contractors?

Contact a contracting officer or specialist for more information about a solicitation. Offerors may not talk to program staff before the award of a contract.

After award, contractors work closely with contracting officer's representatives to resolve most issues. For more information, see About NIAID Research and Development Contracts and read our SOPs:

When should I call my grant or contract specialist?

Call your contract or grant specialist for business or policy questions related to your award. For more insights, read When to Contact an NIAID Grants Management Specialist.

When should I call my program officer?

Contact an NIAID program officer to see whether your application topic would fit into his or her program, learn the status of your application, and possibly get more information about the initial peer review of your application after receiving your summary statement.

For questions about a request for applications or program announcement, call the program officer listed in the NIH Guide announcement. He or she may be able to help you assess your chances of success in applying.

Learn more at When to Contact an NIAID Program Officer.

When should I call my scientific review officer?

Call an NIAID scientific review officer for questions about the review process or about a request for applications.

Can a program officer tell me more about initiatives?

Yes. Read more at Can a program officer tell me more about initiatives than what's stated in the Guide? in our Finding Help questions and answers.

Can a program officer tell me about funding opportunities in other institutes?

Yes. Read more at Who can tell me about funding opportunities in other institutes? in our Finding Help questions and answers.

Whom should I call before my summary statement is in the Commons?

Call the scientific review officer in charge of the initial peer review of your grant application—see Who Peer Reviews Your Application? in the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Whom should I call to find out more about initial peer review?

Talk to a scientific review officer. This person is listed as the "Peer Review Contact" in your funding opportunity announcement and in the eRA Commons after you apply.

For general questions about peer review, you may find answers on the following pages:

If not, find the appropriate contact on the Organization Chart for NIH's Center for Scientific Review. For questions about peer review at NIAID, go to Scientific Review Program Contacts.

Do program staff have any role in initial peer review?

Program officers often attend initial peer review meetings. Though program officers do not participate in the review, they may be able to give you more details about the discussion. They are not allowed to tell you which reviewer said what.

Is an NIAID staff person my application's advocate at initial peer review?

No. The primary reviewer—a non-NIH peer reviewer assigned to your application—becomes its advocate at the review. See Most Reviewers Scan Each Application in the Strategy for NIH Funding.

If I see a code on my summary statement, whom do I call?

Call your program officer to find out how to lift a bar to award on your summary statement.  

For more information, go to:

If my application's funding is deferred, whom do I call?

Call your program officer for advice if your application's funding is deferred till later in the fiscal year.

Also see Outcomes of Second-Level Review in the Strategy for NIH Funding, and learn what to do If Your Application Is Not Discussed in the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Who can answer my budget questions about grants?

Grants management specialists can tell you what costs are allowed and answer budget and other business-related questions. See When to Contact an NIAID Grants Management Specialist.

Who negotiates grant and contract awards?

Grants management specialists and contracting officers negotiate awards. For more information, go to:

If I want to change an animal model on a grant, whom do I call?

Call your program officer for advice. Also read Some Actions Require Our Approval in the Strategy for NIH Funding.

Who approves major project changes for grants?

NIAID's grants management officer approves major project changes, often working with your program officer. Also read Some Actions Require Our Approval in the Strategy for NIH Funding and Prior Approvals for Post-Award Grant Actions SOP.

What if my question wasn't answered here, or I'd like to suggest a question?

Email deaweb@niaid.nih.gov with the title of this page or its URL and your question or comment. We answer questions by email and post them here. Thanks for helping us clarify and expand our knowledge base.

Last Updated November 20, 2013

Last Reviewed June 03, 2013