Skip Navigation

​Small Business Program

Skip Content Marketing
  • Share this:
  • submit to facebook
  • Tweet it
  • submit to reddit
  • submit to StumbleUpon
  • submit to Google +

High-Priority Areas of Interest: Division of AIDS

NIAID encourages applications in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. The mission of Division of AIDS (DAIDS) is to help ensure an end to the HIV/AIDS epidemic by increasing basic knowledge of the pathogenesis and transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); supporting the development of therapies for HIV infection and its complications and co-infections; and supporting the development of vaccines and other prevention strategies.

Below are areas of interests from DAIDS. The subject matter expert is available to answer questions and advise on the application process.

If you do not see your HIV/AIDS-related topic here, the application may not be prioritized but will still be reviewed. Contact Daniella Livnat (NED) or Natalia Kruchinin (NED) if you have any questions about your application and don’t see an appropriate subject matter expert below.

Areas of Interest

Subject Matter Experts

Preclinical development and evaluation of HIV vaccines, adjuvants, and delivery systems in animal models using SIV, SHIV, or HIV.

Vaccines that enhance innate and mucosal immunities and induce broadly reactive and long lasting neutralizing antibodies are program priorities.

Novel technologies (e.g., nanotechnology) and vaccine vectors are also priority areas of research interest.

Yen Li
Preclinical Research and Development Branch
yli@niaid.nih.gov
301-496-3816

Development of anti-HIV agents directed at new viral or cellular targets.

Brigitte Sanders
Targeted Interventions Branch
sandersbe@niaid.nih.gov
301-496-6714

Development of novel anti-HIV drugs and therapeutics with focus on technological aspects such as multiplex analysis of drugs and innovative, streamlined methods for drug screening and drug delivery (e.g., multifunctional therapeutics based on nanotechnology).

Development of bio-assay and bio-imaging applications for the assessment of HIV pathogenesis.

Kailash Gupta
Targeted Interventions Branch
kgupta@niaid.nih.gov
301-435-3724

Preclinical development of single and combination non-vaccine biomedical prevention candidates (topical microbicides, PrEP and multipurpose prevention technologies (MPT)) which prevent the transmission of HIV in the genital and gastrointestinal tracts of men and women.

Development of oral, injectable, implantable, and topical sustained delivery strategies for topical microbicides, PrEP, and MPT.

Creation and advancement of new technologies, targets, and approaches, including nanotechnology, which promote the safety, efficacy, adherence, and acceptability of non-vaccine biomedical prevention candidates and strategies.

Jim A. Turpin
Preclinical Microbicide and Prevention Research Branch
jturpin@niaid.nih.gov
301-451-2732

Development, standardization, validation, and evaluation of improved technologies to detect HIV, to evaluate immune responses to HIV vaccines and to vaccine vectors, or to correlate immune responses associated with vaccine efficacy.

Thandi Onami
Vaccine Clinical Research Branch
thandi.onami@nih.gov
301-594-1321

Development and evaluation of practical and affordable tests to measure viral load, CD4+ cell counts, drug toxicities, and drug resistance to monitor populations in resource-poor settings.

Development of tests to detect early infection in seropositive HIV-infected individuals.

Michael Ussery
Drug Development and Clinical Sciences Branch
mussery@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-0134

Development of novel, non-sputum-based methods for the diagnosis of active and latent TB infection in HIV-positive or HIV-negative infants and children.

Marco Schito
Contractor, Henry M. Jackson Foundation
schitom@niaid.nih.gov
301-594-5374

Preclinical discovery and development of antimicrobial agents directed against Mycobacterium avium, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and Cryptococcus neoformans (and other pathogenic fungi).

Development and delivery of nanotechnology-based therapeutics to target pathogen or pathogen-infected cells.

Influence of antiretrovirals (e.g., ritonavir) on antimicrobial efficacy.

Chris Lambros
Complications and Coinfections Research Branch
cl29r@nih.gov
301-435-3769

Preclinical development and evaluation of therapeutic vaccines and other immune-based therapies to attenuate HIV disease progression or reduce HIV infectiousness.

Tony Conley
Targeted Interventions Branch
conleyto@niaid.nih.gov
301-451-2739

Development of gene therapies for HIV.

Frosso Voulgaropoulou
Targeted Interventions Branch
frossov@mail.nih.gov
301-451-2704

Research to assess and overcome specific biomedical obstacles in HIV vaccine discovery, especially by application of novel technology to vaccine discovery and/or by the development and supply of novel reagents and other resources useful in novel vaccine discovery.

Stuart Shapiro
Preclinical Research and Development Branch
sshapiro@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-0122

Discovery and development of agents or strategies for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) (single or multiple agents, immunological, pharmacological, or other potential approaches directed against viral and/or host targets). Development of pharmacological tools to examine PK/PD in fluids and tissue, new formulation and delivery systems (including nanotechnology-based approaches) for coitally-dissociated use, and optimization of animal models for screening of candidate agents.

David Burns
Clinical Prevention Research Branch
burnsda@niaid.nih.gov
301-435-8896

Development of formulation strategies to deliver antiretrovirals to specific target cells or tissues.

Development of sustained release formulations to be delivered by oral, injectable, implantable, or transdermal routes of administration for treatment of HIV infection.

Steve Turk
Drug Development and Clinical Sciences Branch
sturk@niaid.nih.gov
301-435-3771

Development of novel and improved assays for the determination of HIV incidence.

These diagnostic assays should identify HIV infection before seroconversion, be based on B and non-B subtypes, andinclude the development, incorporation, and validation of process controls.

Usha Sharma
Clinical Prevention Research
usharma@niaid.nih.gov
301-451-3441

Development of rapid tests for the detection of ARTs in various human matrices (e.g. blood, urine, hair).

The assay should require minimal operator effort and expertise, and include the development, incorporation, and validation of process controls.

Hao Zhang
Drug Development and Clinical Sciences Branch
hazhang@niaid.nih.gov
301.451.2191

Useful Links

back to top

Last Updated May 01, 2014

Last Reviewed May 01, 2014