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High-Priority Areas of Interest: Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

NIAID encourages applications focused on detection, diagnostics, treatment, and vaccines. Below are areas of interests from the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID). The subject matter expert is available to answer questions and advise on the application process.

If you do not see your microbiology- or infectious-disease-related topic here, the application may not be prioritized but will still be reviewed. Please contact Barbara Mulach (NED) or Natalia Kruchinin (NED) if you have any questions about your application and don’t see an appropriate subject matter expert below.

Areas of Interest

Subject Matter Experts

Identify and qualify infectious disease-related biomarkers, including:

  • Biomarkers to predict susceptibility to infection.
  • Biomarkers to diagnose an infectious disease.
  • Biomarkers to predict or monitor a subject’s response to a therapeutic, including efficacy and toxicity biomarkers.
  • Biomarkers to predict or monitor a subject’s response to vaccination.
  • Biomarkers to determine the possibility of infection mediated by insect vectors.
  • Biomarkers from natural history studies that could be used to assess disease progression in acute and chronic diseases.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Development of more sensitive and accurate methods of direct detection of Borrelia burgdorferi for the purpose of diagnosing Lyme disease patients.

Diagnostic approaches that contain one or more of the following are also encouraged: substantial and significant advances over conventional antibody-based approaches, methods that take into account host response, ability to detect and differentiate multiple strains of Borrelia burgdorferi, and ability to discriminate between active and previous infection.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Vaccines for NIAID Category A, B, and C priority pathogens including influenza, Ebola, Marburg, arenavirus, and other viral encephalitides.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Vaccine development for tuberculosis, STIs, hepatitis B and C, and malaria and other high-impact global parasitic diseases.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Vaccine enhancement and formulation technologies with the goal of providing protection against multiple infectious disease agents, providing accelerated immune responses (more rapid schedules or reduced number of immunizations), increasing ease of administration (i.e., self-administration), and increasing product stability to minimize cold chain requirements.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Therapeutics for NIAID Category A, B, and C priority pathogens including smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fevers, viral encephalitides, botulinum neurotoxins, and influenza.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Therapeutics for tuberculosis, hepatitis B and C, and malaria and other high-impact global parasitic diseases.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Therapeutics exhibiting broad-spectrum activity against microbial pathogens.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884h

Therapeutic enhancement and formulation technologies with the goal of improving drug development timeframes, productivity, efficacy, specificity, safety, stability, and delivery.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Development of simple, rapid, field-deployable, sensitive, and specific point-of-care in vitro diagnostics for:

  • NIAID Category A, B, and C priority pathogens and those causing emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.
  • Respiratory disease pathogens including tuberculosis, community acquired pneumonia, and influenza, including emerging and re-emerging influenza viruses such as 2009 H1N1 influenza.
  • Sexually transmitted infections, especially those affecting women with limited access to healthcare. These organisms include but are not limited to Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and group B streptococcus.
  • Differentiating among causes of acute febrile illness in tropical and subtropical regions, including bacterial infections and malaria and other high-impact global parasitic diseases.
  • Detection of infectious-disease-causing pathogens (bacteria, viral, or parasite) and determination of their antimicrobial resistance and/or sensitivity profiles.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Development of next generation sequencing and genomic technologies for new diagnostic strategies for infectious diseases including molecular signatures developed from studies on human microbiome and pathogen-host interactions.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

Vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for emerging and re-emerging influenza viruses such as 2009 H1N1 influenza.

Barbara Mulach
Office of Scientific Coordination and Program Operations
bm244j@nih.gov
301-496-1884

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Last Updated May 01, 2014

Last Reviewed May 01, 2014