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Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases

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Image Library

These high-resolution (300 dpi) images may be downloaded directly from this site. All images, except those specified as World Health Organization (WHO) images, are in the public domain. For the public domain images, there is no copyright, no permission required, and no charge for their use.

We thank the organizations that provided these images and, if you use them, we ask that you credit the source. To obtain permission for WHO images, complete and submit the form at the bottom of the WHO copyright page.

For images not found here, visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's public health image library.

Smallpox vaccination dilution study: Dr. John Treanor draws circle on volunteer's arm so  he can later locate the exact spot where he applied the vaccine

Smallpox Vaccination Study-1

Smallpox vaccination dilution study: Dr. John Treanor draws circle on volunteer's arm so he can later locate the exact spot where he applied the vaccine.

Credit: University of Rochester School of Medicine

Smallpox vaccination dilution study:  Dr. John Treanor uses a two-pronged needle to deliver the smallpox vaccine into the arm of a volunteer.

Smallpox Vaccination Study-2

Smallpox vaccination dilution study: Dr. John Treanor uses a two-pronged needle to deliver the smallpox vaccine into the arm of a volunteer.

Credit: University of Rochester School of Medicine

Scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip

Escherichia coli

Scanning electron micrograph of Escherichia coli, grown in culture and adhered to a cover slip.

Credit: NIAID

Scanning electron micrograph depicting a mass of Yersinia pestis bacteria (the cause of bubonic plague) in the foregut of the flea vector

Yersinia pestis

Scanning electron micrograph depicting a mass of Yersinia pestis bacteria (the cause of bubonic plague) in the foregut of the flea vector.

Credit: NIAID

Anthrax heptamer structure

Anthrax Structure

Anthrax heptamer structure.

Credit: R. John Collier, Harvard Medical School

Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella typhimurium (red) invading cultured human cells

Salmonella

Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph showing Salmonella typhimurium (red) bacteria invading cultured human cells.

Credit: NIAID

Coxiella burnetii, the bacteria that causes Q fever

Q Fever

Coxiella burnetii, the bacteria that cause Q fever.

Credit: NIAID

BSL-4 laboratory worker wearing protective gear

BSL-4 Lab, Protective Gear

BSL-4 laboratory worker wearing protective gear.

Credit: USAMRIID, DoD

Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows splenic tissue from a monkey with inhalational anthrax; featured are rod-shaped bacilli (yellow) and an erythrocyte (red)

Anthrax

Color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph shows splenic tissue from a monkey with inhalational anthrax; featured are rod-shaped bacilli (yellow) and an erythrocyte (red).

Credit: Arthur Friedlander

Images from WHO

All images below are copyright protected by WHO. To obtain permission for these images, complete and submit the form at the bottom of the WHO copyright page.

Use of bifurcated needle for multipuncture smallpox vaccination

Smallpox Vaccination

Use of bifurcated needle for multipuncture smallpox vaccination.

Credit: WHO

Cutaneous anthrax lesions on a man infected with the bacterium Bacillus anthracis

Cutaneous Anthrax

Cutaneous anthrax lesions on a man infected with the bacterium Bacillus anthracis.

Copyright: WHO

Colony of Bacillus anthracis on selective agar plate after 42 hours at 37°C

Anthrax in Culture Dish

Colony of Bacillus anthracis on selective agar plate after 42 hours at 37°C.

Copyright: WHO

Gazelle killed by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax

Anthrax in the Wild

Gazelle killed by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax.

Copyright: WHO

 

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Last Updated December 17, 2006