Learn Our Lingo: The Nine Application Types

Funding News Edition: March 09, 2016
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Without proper context, you may be confused when our articles or staff refer to specific application types. Let’s clear up that confusion.

The first digit on any application identification number corresponds to its application type. Take a moment to review the nine types:

  • Type 1—New. Provides NIH funding support for a new grant.
  • Type 2—Renewal. Requests another project period. These applications are peer reviewed and must compete with other applications of the same type and timing for funding.
  • Type 3—Supplement. Provides additional funds to a grant as an administrative supplement or revision. A revision is sometimes referred to as a “competing supplement.” The revision provides additional funds to expand the scope of a grant and requires peer review, whereas an administrative supplement can’t be used to expand a grant's scope and does not require peer review.
  • Type 4—Extension. Provides time and funds beyond the recommended level for a project segment without external peer review. Can also be used administratively to separate funding segments. Note that this year NIH is using Type 4s administratively to assist the transition to Payment Management System subaccounts for those that were in pooled accounts in FY 2016.
  • Type 5—Noncompeting continuation. Continues support in the out years of a grant; does not compete for funds. The Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) is the progress reporting application type for all Type 5s.
  • Type 6—Change of grantee. Transfers a grant only when one organization acquires or merges with another, also called successor-in-interest.
  • Type 7—Change of grantee. Transfers a grant from one institution to another (other than Type 6).
  • Type 8—Change of NIH institute. Transfers a Type 5 grant before award from one NIH institute to another (an intra-NIH transfer of the awarding responsibility). The Type 5 grant’s application identification number will likely change, especially when the numeric portion of the grant number at the losing NIH institute has already been used by a funded or unfunded grant at the gaining NIH institute.
  • Type 9—Change of NIH institute. Transfers a Type 1 or Type 2 grant before award from one NIH institute to another (an intra-NIH transfer of the awarding responsibility). The Type 1/Type 2 grant’s application identification number will likely change, especially when the numeric portion of the grant number at the losing NIH institute has already been used by a funded or unfunded grant at the gaining NIH institute.

You may have noticed that “Resubmission” is missing from the list. That’s because it is not an application type; it’s a type ofapplication submission. We use A0 and A1 to refer to new and resubmitted applications, respectively. You can resubmit a Type 1 application, but it is still an application for funding support to a new grant. Since the word “new” can mean “Type 1” or “not a resubmission,” always check the context.

To learn about the different types of award mechanisms and activity codes NIAID uses—for example, a cooperative agreement versus a research project grant—explore Types of Funding Opportunities.

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