Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) News Releases

NIH Scientists Say Advanced Vaccines Could Limit Future Outbreaks
March 22, 2018

Novel vaccine technologies are critical to improving the public health response to infectious disease threats that continually emerge and re-emerge, according to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. In a perspective in The Journal of the American Medical Association, the experts highlight innovations that could significantly shorten the typical decades-long vaccine development timeline.

Investigational Vaccine Protects Cattle from Respiratory Syncytial Virus
March 10, 2017

A novel vaccine developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, protected cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, according to research published online in npj Vaccines on March 8. The research was conducted by a team of experts at NIAID, the Pirbright Institute based in the United Kingdom, and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Switzerland.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Enters Clinical Testing
February 22, 2017

A Phase 1 clinical trial to test the safety and tolerability of an investigational vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has begun at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The trial also will assess the vaccine’s ability to prompt an immune response in healthy adult participants. The investigational vaccine was developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH.

RSV Pediatric Vaccine Candidate Shows Promise in Early Clinical Trial
November 5, 2015

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and colleagues  have developed a vaccine candidate to protect infants and young children against respiratory syncytial virus that appears to elicit a stronger protective immune response than the previous lead vaccine candidate.

NIH Launches Human RSV Study
August 26, 2015

​A new study will expose healthy adult volunteers to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Better understanding of how adults develop RSV infection and immune system responses to infection will help researchersdevelop and test future antivirals and vaccines to combat the virus.