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Vaccines News Releases

NIH and Partners Launch HIV Vaccine Efficacy Study
November 30, 2017

The National Institutes of Health and partners have launched a large clinical trial to assess whether an experimental HIV vaccine regimen is safe and able to prevent HIV infection. The new Phase 2b proof-of-concept study, called Imbokodo, aims to enroll 2,600 HIV-negative women in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 1.8 million new HIV infections worldwide in 2016, 43 percent occurred in eastern and southern Africa, with women and girls disproportionately affected.

Fighting the Flu, Year after Year
November 29, 2017

In a New England Journal of Medicine perspective, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne discuss how the process of preparing seasonal influenza vaccines in eggs may contribute to their limited effectiveness. The authors offer research strategies that might yield more protective vaccine candidates.

Experts Outline Pathway to a Universal Influenza Vaccine
October 17, 2017

Scientists and clinicians from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and the California Institute of Technology discuss key considerations for developing a universal influenza vaccine in a meeting report appearing in the October 17 issue of Immunity. The report summarizes discussions from a workshop NIAID held June 28-29, 2017, in Rockville, Maryland, entitled, “Pathway to a Universal Influenza Vaccine.” The workshop brought together U.S.

Experimental Ebola Vaccines Elicit Year-Long Immune Response
October 11, 2017

Results from a large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Liberia show that two candidate Ebola vaccines pose no major safety concerns and can elicit immune responses by one month after initial vaccination that last for at least one year. The findings, published in the October 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, are based on a study of 1,500 adults that began during the West Africa Ebola outbreak.

NIH-Supported Scientists Elicit Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to HIV in Calves
July 20, 2017

Scientists supported by the National Institutes of Health have achieved a significant step forward, eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV by immunizing calves. The findings offer insights for HIV vaccine design, and support further study of modified bovine antibodies as HIV therapeutics or prevention tools in humans, scientists reported in a paper published online today in Nature.

Experimental Zika Virus Vaccines Restrict In Utero Virus Transmission in Mice
July 13, 2017

Two experimental vaccines can restrict Zika virus transmission from pregnant mice to their fetuses and can prevent Zika virus-induced placental damage and fetal demise, according to new findings published July 13 in Cell. Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB); and other partners conducted the research.

Details of Lassa Virus Structure Could Inform Development of Vaccines, Therapies
June 2, 2017

A 10-year Lassa virus research project has yielded structural and functional details of a key viral surface protein that could help advance development of Lassa vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics, which are currently lacking. The work was led by the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Modified Experimental Vaccine Protects Monkeys from Deadly Malaria
May 22, 2017

WHAT:Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days. 

NIH Statement on HIV Vaccine Awareness Day
May 18, 2017

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesCarl W. Dieffenbach, Ph.D., Director, Division of AIDS, NIAID

Ebola: New Trial Launched in West Africa to Evaluate Three Vaccination Strategies
April 6, 2017

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), in collaboration with health authorities in Guinea and Liberia, are launching a large clinical trial of candidate Ebola vaccines under the aegis of the PREVAC international consortium (Partnership for Research on Ebola VACcination). 

Phase 2 Zika Vaccine Trial Begins in U.S., Central and South America
March 31, 2017

Vaccinations have begun in a multi-site Phase 2/2b clinical trial testing an experimental DNA vaccine designed to protect against disease caused by Zika infection. The vaccine was developed by government scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

New Adjuvant Permits Early Pneumococcal Immunization in Newborn Monkeys
March 23, 2017

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that children receive pneumococcal conjugate vaccinations (PCV13) against potentially life-threatening pneumococcal disease at two, four and six months of age. Earlier immunization would confer greater protection when infants are most vulnerable to disease, but newborns’ immature immune systems limit their capacity to respond effectively to PCV13 and establish immunity. 

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Regimen Induced Durable Immune Response, Study Finds
March 14, 2017

A two-vaccine regimen intended to protect against Ebola virus disease induced an immune response that persisted for approximately one year in healthy adult volunteers, according to results from a Phase 1 clinical trial published in the March 14th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The investigational vaccines included Ad26.ZEBOV, developed by Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, and MVA-BN-Filo, developed by Bavarian Nordic.

Monkeys Suppress HIV-Like Virus for Extended Period after Dual-Antibody Treatment
March 13, 2017

Giving monkeys two powerful anti-HIV antibodies immediately after infection with an HIV-like virus enabled the immune systems of some of the animals to control the virus long after the antibodies were gone, scientists at the National Institutes of Health and The Rockefeller University have found.  

Investigational Vaccine Protects Cattle from Respiratory Syncytial Virus
March 10, 2017

A novel vaccine developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, protected cattle from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, according to research published online in npj Vaccines on March 8. The research was conducted by a team of experts at NIAID, the Pirbright Institute based in the United Kingdom, and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Switzerland.

Experimental PfSPZ Malaria Vaccine Provides Durable Protection Against Multiple Strains in NIH Clinical Trial
February 21, 2017

An investigational malaria vaccine has protected a small number of healthy U.S. adults from infection with a malaria strain different from that contained in the vaccine, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, sponsored and co-conducted the Phase 1 clinical trial.

NIH Begins Study of Vaccine to Protect Against Mosquito-Borne Diseases
February 21, 2017

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has launched a Phase 1 clinical trial to test an investigational vaccine intended to provide broad protection against a range of mosquito-transmitted diseases, such as Zika, malaria, West Nile fever and dengue fever, and to hinder the ability of mosquitoes to transmit such infections. The study, which is being conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, will examine the experimental vaccine’s safety and ability to generate an immune response. 

Investigational PfSPZ Malaria Vaccine Demonstrates Considerable Protection in Malian Adults for Duration of Malaria Season
February 15, 2017

An investigational malaria vaccine given intravenously was well-tolerated and protected a significant proportion of healthy adults against infection with Plasmodium falciparum malaria—the deadliest form of the disease—for the duration of the malaria season, according to new findings published in the February 15th issue of the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases. The study participants live in Mali, Africa, where they are naturally exposed to the parasite.

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Plus Chloroquine Protects Against Controlled Infection, Study Finds
February 15, 2017

An experimental malaria vaccine strategy known as PfSPZ-CVac, together with antimalarial medication, protected all nine clinical trial volunteers given three high-dose vaccinations, according to study results published today in Nature. 

Investigational mRNA Vaccine Protects Mice and Monkeys from Zika Virus Infection
February 2, 2017

A novel, gene-based investigational vaccine protected mice and monkeys against Zika virus infection after a single dose, according to a study appearing online in the journal Nature on Feb. 2. The research was conducted by investigators funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), NIAID scientists, and other partners. The candidate vaccine, called ZIKV prM-E mRNA-LNP, uses messenger RNA (mRNA) with which the body produces Zika virus proteins designed to elicit infection-neutralizing antibodies.

NIH-Supported Scientists Accelerate Immune Response to Tuberculosis in Mice
December 22, 2016

WHAT:New research findings provide insight into the immune system pathways that may be key to developing an effective tuberculosis (TB) vaccine. The study, to be published Thursday in the journal Nature Communications, was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.

First New HIV Vaccine Efficacy Study in Seven Years Has Begun
November 27, 2016

The first HIV vaccine efficacy study to launch anywhere in seven years is now testing whether an experimental vaccine regimen safely prevents HIV infection among South African adults. The study, called HVTN 702, involves a new version of the only HIV vaccine candidate ever shown to provide some protection against the virus. HVTN 702 aims to enroll 5,400 men and women, making it the largest and most advanced HIV vaccine clinical trial to take place in South Africa, where more than 1,000 people become infected with HIV every day. 

Testing of Investigational Inactivated Zika Vaccine in Humans Begins
November 7, 2016

The first of five early stage clinical trials to test the safety and ability of an investigational Zika vaccine candidate called the Zika Purified Inactivated Virus (ZPIV) vaccine to generate an immune system response has begun at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) Clinical Trial Center in Silver Spring, Maryland. Scientists with WRAIR, part of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), developed the vaccine.

Experimental Zika Virus DNA Vaccines Protective in Monkeys
September 22, 2016

Two experimental Zika virus DNA vaccines developed by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists protected monkeys against Zika infection after two doses, according to a study published in Science. One of those vaccines is being evaluated in a Phase 1 human trial now under way in three U.S. locations to evaluate the vaccine’s safety and ability to generate immune responses in people.

NIH Begins Testing Investigational Zika Vaccine in Humans
August 3, 2016

​The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of a vaccine candidate intended to prevent Zika virus infection. The early-stage study will evaluate the experimental vaccine’s safety and ability to generate an immune system response in participants.

NIH-Funded Scientists Identify Immunological Profiles of People Who Make Powerful HIV Antibodies
July 29, 2016

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. While bNAbs cannot completely clear HIV infections in people who have already acquired the virus, many scientists believe a successful preventive HIV vaccine must induce bNAbs

Zika Infection Is Caused by One Virus Serotype, NIH Study Finds
July 29, 2016

Vaccination against a single strain of Zika virus should be sufficient to protect against genetically diverse strains of the virus, according to a study conducted by investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); Washington University in St. Louis; and Emory University in Atlanta.

NIH Launches Early-Stage Yellow Fever Vaccine Trial
July 27, 2016

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has begun an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against yellow fever virus.

Vaccine Strategy Induces Antibodies that Can Target Multiple Influenza Viruses
July 22, 2016

WHAT: Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. The discovery will help guide development of a universal influenza vaccine, according to investigators at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and collaborators who conducted the research. The findings appear in the July 21st online edition of Cell.

HIV Vaccine Research Requires Unprecedented Path
July 12, 2016

The development of an effective vaccine to prevent HIV infections would represent a critical step toward ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Thus far, the only large clinical trial for an HIV vaccine to show promise was the RV144 study conducted in Thailand in 2009, which resulted in a modest 31 percent reduction in infection. Researchers are working to improve on the results of RV144 and also have launched efforts to create vaccines that induce broadly neutralizing antibodies that can block a wide range of HIV variants.

Zika Vaccines Protect Mice from Infection
June 28, 2016

A single dose of either of two experimental Zika vaccines fully protected mice challenged with Zika virus four or eight weeks after receiving the inoculations. The research, conducted by investigators supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, suggests that similar vaccines for people could be similarly protective.

Novel Strategy May Improve Seasonal Flu Vaccine Effectiveness
May 23, 2016

New findings describe a novel strategy for predicting how circulating influenza viruses will evolve, an approach that may help scientists create better seasonal influenza vaccines.

Zika Virus Protein Could Be Vaccine Target
May 19, 2016

A viral protein known as NS5 is a promising target for vaccines against Zika and related viruses, according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and colleagues at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine.

NIH Statement on HIV Vaccine Awareness Day 2016
May 18, 2016

Advances in HIV/AIDS research have given us the opportunity to transform the lives of those living with HIV while providing highly effective methods of preventing the infection. This progress has strengthened optimism for achieving a durable end to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Trial to Launch in South Africa
May 18, 2016

An early-stage HIV vaccine clinical trial in South Africa has determined that an investigational vaccine regimen is safe and generates comparable immune responses to those reported in a landmark 2009 study showing that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection.

NIH-Led Team Discovers New HIV Vaccine Target
May 12, 2016

A team led by scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has reported a research trifecta. They discovered a new vulnerable site on HIV for a vaccine to target, a broadly neutralizing antibody that binds to that target site, and how the antibody stops the virus from infecting a cell.

Investigational Malaria Vaccine Protects Healthy U.S. Adults for More than One Year
May 9, 2016

An experimental malaria vaccine protected a small number of healthy, malaria-naïve adults in the United States from infection for more than one year after immunization, according to results from a Phase 1 trial described in the May 9th issue of Nature Medicine.

Two-Vaccine Ebola Regimen Shows Promise in Early-Stage Clinical Trial
April 19, 2016

An immunization regimen using two Ebola vaccine candidates was safe and well-tolerated and induced an immune response in healthy adult volunteers in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Results from the study are described in the April 19th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Experimental Dengue Vaccine Protects All Recipients in Virus Challenge Study
March 16, 2016

A clinical trial in which volunteers were infected with dengue virus six months after receiving either an experimental dengue vaccine developed by scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or a placebo injection yielded starkly contrasting results. All 21 volunteers who received the vaccine, TV003, were protected from infection, while all 20 placebo recipients developed infection.

Experimental Ebola Vaccines Well Tolerated, Immunogenic in Phase 2 Study
February 23, 2016

Two investigational vaccines designed to protect against Ebola virus disease were well-tolerated and induced an immune response among 1,000 vaccinated participants in the Phase 2 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial called PREVAIL I.

Dengue Vaccine Enters Phase 3 Trial in Brazil
January 14, 2016

A large-scale clinical trial to evaluate whether a candidate vaccine can prevent the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever has been launched in Brazil. The vaccine, TV003, was developed by scientists in the laboratory of Stephen Whitehead, Ph.D., at NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

HIV Antibody Infusion Safely Suppresses Virus in Infected People
December 23, 2015

A single infusion of a powerful antibody called VRC01 can suppress the level of HIV in the blood of infected people who are not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), scientists at the National Institutes of Health report. 

Prime-Boost H7N9 Influenza Vaccine Concept Promising in Clinical Trial
December 10, 2015

Several candidate H7N9 pandemic influenza vaccines made from inactivated viruses have been shown to be safe and to generate an immune response.

NIH-Sponsored Clinical Trial of Chikungunya Vaccine Opens
November 24, 2015

An experimental vaccine to protect against the mosquito-borne illness chikungunya is being tested in a Phase 2 trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

NIH Launches Initiative to Develop Long-Acting HIV Treatment and Prevention Tools
November 18, 2015

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, launched a major initiative to advance novel approaches to treat and prevent HIV infections based on broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs)

RSV Pediatric Vaccine Candidate Shows Promise in Early Clinical Trial
November 5, 2015

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and colleagues  have developed a vaccine candidate to protect infants and young children against respiratory syncytial virus that appears to elicit a stronger protective immune response than the previous lead vaccine candidate.

NIH-Funded Study Reveals Why Malaria Vaccine Only Partially Protected Children, Infants
October 22, 2015

Using new, highly sensitive genomic sequencing technology, an international team of researchers has found new biological evidence to help explain why the malaria vaccine candidate RTS,S/AS01 (called RTS,S) provided only moderate protection among vaccinated children during clinical testing.

Immune Responses Provide Clues for HIV Vaccine Development
October 21, 2015

Recent research has yielded new information about immune responses associated with—and potentially responsible for—protection from HIV infection, providing leads for new strategies to develop an HIV vaccine. 

Experimental Aerosol TB Vaccine Protects Monkeys, NIH-Funded Researchers Find
October 16, 2015

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have developed an investigational aerosol tuberculosis vaccine that induced potent immune responses in a small number of rhesus macaques and protected them against pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis .

Experimental MERS Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Studies
July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. 

Two Paths Pave Way for Development of a Preventive HIV Vaccine
July 23, 2015

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases& scientists offer a historical perspective on the search for a safe, effective HIV vaccine and describe how they influence current promising approaches in HIV vaccinology.

NIAID-Funded HIV Vaccine Research Generates Key Antibodies in Animal Models
June 18, 2015

​A trio of studies describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The study teams demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies.

Anti-HIV Antibody Shows Promise in First Human Study
April 8, 2015

A single infusion of an experimental anti-HIV antibody called 3BNC117 resulted in significantly decreased HIV levels that persisted for as long as 28 days in HIV-infected individuals, according to Phase 1 clinical trial findings published online in Nature. 

Scientists Report on Trial of Early-Generation Ebola, Marburg Vaccine Candidates
December 23, 2014

Results of an early-stage clinical trial of two experimental vaccines against Ebola and Marburg viruses-the first to be completed in an African country-showed that they were safe and induced immune responses in healthy volunteers. 

NIAID/GSK Experimental Ebola Vaccine Appears Safe, Prompts Immune Response
November 26, 2014

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. 

BULLETIN: In South Africa, RV144 HIV Vaccine Regimen Induces Immune Responses Similar to Those Seen in Thailand
October 28, 2014

​The investigational HIV vaccine regimen that showed a modestly protective effect in the landmark RV144 clinical trial conducted in Thailand was shown to be safe and elicited robust immune responses when tested among 100 healthy adults in South Africa, according to findings presented today at the HIVR4P conference in Cape Town, South Africa. The results from the trial, called HVTN 097, bode well for plans to test a similar experimental vaccine regimen in South Africa beginning in 2015 in an effort to build upon the results of the RV144 study.

NIH Grants License Agreement for Candidate Ebola Vaccines
October 15, 2014

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today announced a new license agreement aimed at advancing dual-purpose candidate vaccines to protect against rabies and Ebola viruses. 

Candidate H7N9 Avian Flu Vaccine Works Better with Adjuvant
October 7, 2014

​An experimental vaccine to protect people against H7N9 avian influenza prompted immune responses in 59 percent of volunteers who received two injections at the lowest dosage tested but only if the vaccine was mixed with adjuvant. 

Chikungunya Epidemic Poses New Threat to Western Hemisphere and Possibly to the United States
July 16, 2014

Chikungunya was detected in the Caribbean in late 2013 and has now infected at least 355,000 people in more than 20 countries or jurisdictions in the Americas. 

NIH Study Offers Clues to Making Vaccine for Infant Respiratory Illness
April 25, 2013

An atomic-level snapshot of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) protein bound to a human antibody represents a leap toward developing a vaccine for a common-and sometimes very serious-childhood disease. The findings, by scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, define the vulnerable shape of a critical RSV component called the fusion glycoprotein.