Study of the Immune Response to the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine and How Previous Infection With SARS-CoV-2 May Change That Response

Official Study Title: Systems Analyses of the Immune Response to the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

This study evaluates the immune response to the seasonal influenza vaccine in healthy individuals, and also investigates whether prior SARS-CoV-2 infection may change that response.

What does the study involve?

There are eight required visits at the NIH Clinical Center – five occur in the first month. Only two visits require a clinic visit. The first clinic visit will be a brief history and physical. At the second clinic visit, subjects will receive the seasonal influenza vaccine. All other visits are blood draws at NIH phlebotomy. Subjects also have the option to provide three research stool samples and continue monthly blood draws for one year after vaccination.

Is compensation provided?

Subjects are compensated $20/hour for the first hour and $10/hour for each subsequent hour. Stool is compensated $20/sample. There are two completion bonuses: $50 for completing all required visits and $20 for getting blood drawn on specified days. A $50 bonus is also provided if a subject attends at least four optional monthly visits after the required visits.

Who can participate?

Healthy volunteers ages 18 and older can participate in this study. Individuals who were previously confirmed to have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes COVID-19, may be eligible to participate.

Where is it taking place?

The NIH in Bethesda, Maryland

Visit ClinicalTrials.gov for details.

Contact Information

Subjects may contact the Office of Patient Recruitment at 800-411-1222

niaidflustudy2020@mail.nih.gov

Participating in Research

Watch a series of short informational videos about participating in clinical trials. These videos are intended to help potential participants understand how research works, what questions they should consider asking, and things to think about when deciding whether or not to participate in a study.

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