“REAP” the Benefits of a New FOA, Get To Know a Different “AREA”

For many of you, December was probably a busy month, so you may have missed the publication of the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP) for Health Professional Schools and Graduate Schools (R15, Clinical Trial Not Allowed). In case you did, we provide a brief overview of it and a related research enhancement FOA.

REAP in a Nutshell

As the FOA’s title indicates, REAP is for faculty members at eligible health professional schools and graduate schools. They can receive support for small-scale research projects that provide research experiences to undergraduate and/or graduate students pursuing biomedical or behavioral research.

Proposed research projects must involve undergraduate and/or graduate students. “Involvement” includes helping design experiments and controls, collecting and analyzing data, presenting at meetings, and drafting journal articles. Keep in mind that REAP is a research grant program, not a training or fellowship program.

Interested applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs for the entire project period, the maximum being three years.

NIH’s standard Application Due Dates and AIDS and AIDS-Related Due Dates apply. The first application due dates are February 25, 2019, for non-AIDS applications and May 7, 2019, for AIDS applications.

For complete details, including eligibility requirements for institutions, read the December 21, 2018 Guide announcement. If you have questions, contact the NIAID AI Training Help Desk at AITrainingHelpDesk@niaid.nih.gov.

A Change to a Familiar “AREA”

As we mentioned in our September 19, 2018 article “New Way To Apply for Academic Research Enhancement Award,” NIH expired the Academic Research Enhancement Award (Parent R15, Clinical Trial Not Allowed) and is not reissuing it.

In its stead is the Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) for Undergraduate-Focused Institutions (R15, Clinical Trial Not Allowed), which supports small-scale research projects from faculty at undergraduate-focused institutions that do not receive substantial funding from NIH.

Undergraduate students must be involved in proposed research projects. Additionally, the research team must be composed primarily of undergraduate students. For examples of what “involvement” entails, see REAP in a Nutshell above.

Interested applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs for the entire project period, the maximum being three years. NIH’s standard Application Due Dates and AIDS and AIDS-Related Due Dates apply.

For complete information, including eligibility requirements for institutions, see the March 15, 2018 Guide announcement. If you have questions, contact the NIAID AI Training Help Desk at AITrainingHelpDesk@niaid.nih.gov.

More on REAP and AREA

The REAP and AREA FOAs are the results of changes to the R15 activity code, as described under R15 Changes in 2019 at NIH Research Enhancement Award (R15).

If you are unsure about institution or investigator eligibility or other aspects of the REAP and AREA opportunities, go to Frequently Asked Questions, which includes How do I decide whether to apply to the REAP or AREA R15 opportunities? Is eligibility determined by the student population or the institution?.

Content last reviewed on February 6, 2019

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