Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) Public Dataset

In addition to its role in clinical epidemiology, the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) conducts high quality pathogenesis research, and is a unique resource for research because of the depth of data and specimens available from each study visit. WIHS specimens are collected and processed under strict quality control to promote the widest possible range of uses for current and future investigations.  WIHS data and specimens also provide the platform for other HIV-related, NIH-funded grants.  The combination of decades-long clinical and interview data has enabled the evolution of a substantial clinical research database.  Furthermore, return of laboratory and other test results from WIHS affiliated studies to the overall WIHS database ensures that the depth of WIHS data increases over time. 

Availability of these data to internal and external investigators is both cost-effective and efficient. Because highly characterized participants in WIHS remain in follow-up, future research opportunities can build upon existing data and specimens. WIHS also fosters the development of the next generation of observational and clinical epidemiologists by remaining at the forefront in the collection and statistical analysis of observational data. 

Main Areas of Focus

  • To provide de-identified data (meeting HIPAA criteria) that may assist anyone interested in public health research focused on HIV
  • To provide the platform for other HIV-related, NIH-funded grants
  • To enable the evolution of a substantial clinical research database

Tools

  • A WIHS Public Dataset is made available annually and provides de-identified data (meeting HIPAA criteria) that may assist anyone interested in public health research focused on HIV

Location

The Public Use Dataset is available via the WIHS Data Management and Analysis Center (WDMAC), located at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in  Baltimore, MD

Who Can Use This Resource

  • Available to anyone interested in public health research focused on HIV

How To Get Started

Content last reviewed on November 17, 2017